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Syllable Weight Notation Conventions

Factors which determine syllable weight in each language are indicated in the Comment column of the database. The following conventions are used:

VV

long vowel

V

short vowel if contrasted with VV, otherwise any vowel

v

reduced vowel

C

consonant

X

segment (vowel or consonant)

N

sonorant or nasal, as indicated

K

obstruent

6

schwa

(X)

optional X, e.g. V(K) is a syllable with a short vowel optionally followed by an obstruent

>

"is heavier than", e.g. VV > V indicates syllables with long vowels are heavier than syllables with short vowels (whether opened or closed by a consonant); VX > V indicates that syllables with long vowels and closed syllables are heavier than short opened syllables

L,H,s

Foot shapes are indicated, where relevant, using 'L' and 'H' to designate light and heavy syllables, and 's' to designate a syllable of arbitrary shape (i.e. where weight doesn't matter). The foot head is designated with an apostrophe where necessary, e.g. ('LL) or (LL') for left- or right-headed feet, respectively. (HL) and (LH) represent respectively left- and right-headed feet, unless marked otherwise. In some languages, primary stress is sensitive to more than two degrees of syllable weight. In those languages, unless indicated otherwise, L refers to the lightest syllable weight and H refers to all heavier weights

1ry, 2ry

refer to primary and secondary stress, respecti