Dr Nick Nash

Research Fellow

Research group:
Social & Environmental Psychology
Email:
NashN1@cardiff.ac.uk
Telephone:
029 208 74682
Location:
Room 8.05, Tower Building, Park Place

Research summary

My research interests broadly revolve around social psychological approaches to environmental psychology, primarily using qualitative methodologies or mixed methods. Currently, I am involved in research examining the complex and contextual nature of individual-level perceptions of climate change and pro-environmental behaviour, in Wales and cross-culturally.

Selected publications (2014 onwards)

 

Full list of publications

 

Research topics and related papers

CASPI: My current main research work at Cardiff is as a Research Fellow on the European Research Council-funded 'Low-carbon Lifestyles and Behavioural Spillover' project with Dr. Lorraine Whitmarsh and Dr. Wouter Poortinga. The project aims to examine perceptions of pro-environmental behaviour, lifestyles and spillover across a range of different cultures. ‘Spillover’ in this context is the process by which one pro-environmental leads to the uptake of other pro-environmental behaviours, and we will be looking at the conditions around which spillover occurs (or does not occur). For more detail, please visit our project webpage.

Strong Roots: Funded by the Welsh Government, ‘Strong Roots’ comprises a sequence of applied research projects aimed at increasing climate change adaptation and resilience to climate change impacts at the level of Town and Community Councils across Wales. Working with Environment Wales, One Voice Wales, the Climate Change Consortium of Wales and Natural Resources Wales, As social research consultant on the project, I have been involved in documenting the breadth of perceptions expressed by councillors on a range of issues relating to climate change, local government and community engagement, with the intention of a) gauging the potential of Town and Community Councils to address climate change impacts in their communities, b) piloting a programme designed to empower councils to take action on climate change adaptation and resilience within their communities and c)  inform initiatives for programmes, workshops and tool-kits that can be rolled out to Town and Community Councils across Wales.

Perceptions of Carbon Capture and Energy Technologies: this project is looking at public perceptions of a range of energy technologies, including carbon capture and storage, ‘fracking’ and offshore wind power. The project employs a range of novel qualitative methods and structured interviews to gauge what people think and feel about the technologies in detail, and takes into account the wider lifestyle issues that colour those perceptions.

Research Group

Understanding Risk Group
Sustainable Places Research Institute
Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research
Climate Change Consortium of Wales (C3W)

Research Collaborators

Dr. Lorraine Whitmarsh (CASPI)
Rhodri Thomas (Environment Wales)
Paul Egan (One Voice Wales)
Jim Poole (Natural Resources Wales)
Lydia Beaman (C3W)

Postgraduate research interests

My research interests broadly revolve around social psychological approaches to environmental psychology, primarily using qualitative methodologies or mixed methods. Currently, I am involved in research examining the complex and contextual nature of individual-level perceptions of climate change and pro-environmental behaviour, in Wales and cross-culturally.

Undergraduate education

BSc (Hons) Psychology and Health Science, University of the West of England, 1999.

Postgraduate education

MSc Applied Social Psychology, University of Bath, 2002.
MRes (Psychology), University of Bath, 2003.
PhD Psychology (‘Not in my Front Garden’: The Discursive Analysis of a Greenfield Development Proposal) University of Bath, 2008.

Employment

2014-: Research Fellow, School of Psychology, Cardiff University.
2010-2014: Freelance Social Researcher.
2010-2011: Teaching Fellow, Department of Psychology, University of Bath.
2008-2010: Academic Assistant, Department of Psychology, University of Bath.