David Greeno

Research group:
Cognitive Science
Email:
GreenoDJ@cardiff.ac.uk
Telephone:
029 208 70839
Location:
58 Park Place

Research summary

I am interested in the role that perceptual organisation and motor planning behaviour plays in human memory and cognition. In particular, I am interested in their effects upon performance in auditory and verbal short-term memory tasks. Performance in such tasks is typically explained by relying on the classical distinction between long-term memory and short-term memory and processes that operate within a short-term memory store such as interference and decay. Key phenomena such as the word-length effect, lexicality effect and the frequency effect are all used as evidence of a distinct short-term memory store and as evidence of the processes proposed to operate within it. My research aims to demonstrate that performance can instead be reinterpreted in terms of the use of perceptual and motor skills and that, rather than processes operating within a distinct short-term memory store, it is actually the opportunistic use of these skills that causes short-term memory phenomena to emerge

Teaching summary

I am a Graduate Teaching Assistant (GTA) for year one, Level 4 and 5, modules (Introduction to Psychology, Psychological Research, Social Psychology, Language and Memory and Biological Psychology). The role involves delivering weekly seminars, preparing teaching materials, essay marking and providing general support.

Full list of publications

 

Research topics and related papers

I am interested in the role that perceptual organisation and motor planning behaviour plays in human memory and cognition. In particular, I am interested in their effects upon performance in auditory and verbal short-term memory tasks. Performance in such tasks is typically explained by relying on the classical distinction between long-term memory and short-term memory and processes that operate within a short-term memory store such as interference and decay. Key phenomena such as the word-length effect, lexicality effect and the frequency effect are all used as evidence of a distinct short-term memory store and as evidence of the processes proposed to operate within it. My research aims to demonstrate that performance can instead be reinterpreted in terms of the use of perceptual and motor skills and that, rather than processes operating within a distinct short-term memory store, it is actually the opportunistic use of these skills that causes short-term memory phenomena to emerge.

Funding

ESRC/Cardiff School of Psychology

Undergraduate education

2013: BSc (Hons) Psychology. Plymouth University.

Postgraduate education

2014: MSc Psychological Research Methods. Plymouth University.